The following lists the contents of Self and Society, Volume 30 Issue 5.
Each article can be downloaded as a PDF, but only if you are logged in as an AHP subscriber.
The table of contents for this issue can be downloaded as a PDF file.


Editorial:
Author: Maxine Linnell
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Letter:
Letters
Author: Tree Staunton
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integration:
A unified psychotherapy?
Author: Peter Lomas
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Abstract:

Human beings have developed an impressive capacity to discriminate: to arrange their perception of the world into precise entities to which they then give names so that they can communicate about them. In achieving this feat they have, however, become very dependent on this ability. Indeed, we may wonder whether it has become counterproductive. In contemporary society everything that is studied, and the methods by which it is studied, are divided into categories. It has now come to a point where, to be considered a person of worth, one must be a specialist.


Article:
A journey towards integration
Author: Catherine Leder
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Abstract:


The Tyranny of Object Relations
Author: Roger Horrocks
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Individual Psychology and Logotherapy: Facing the Challenge of the 21
Author: Chris G. Maddox
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Abstract:

The evolution of dynamic psychology has been highly contradictory and uneven due in part to differences of emphasis and focus, and also due to philosophical and theoretical differences, which led to congruent and incongruent results between the respective schools. Now, especially with the new millennium, many are asking again whether in fact we should not go beyond the different schools towards a new sense of unity and purpose. Today there is a call for integration and a sense of common purpose, although how this is to be achieved is not clear. However, it has been argued that the introversion of a theory and the defence of its purity by its adherents will act as a brake on its growth and further development (John, 1998; Millar, 2000). The basis of any theory is always incomplete (Fromm, 1980) and consequently scientific progress must come as a result of open dialogue and debate for the benefit of all schools of psychology and psychotherapy. Classically, Adlerian psychology was founded upon a flexible and open-ended approach to the understanding of human nature. Orgler, for example, notes that Adler avoided offering a ‘rigid scheme’ that could easily be copied by physicians and therapists (Orgler, 1973, p.167). And, regarding training, Orgler writes that ‘Adler demanded a thorough knowledge of other psychological schools, of philosophy and of pedagogy’ (ibid, p.176).


AHP page
Author: John Buckle
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AHPP Page
Author: Tone Horwood
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The Mirroring—not by Harold Pinter
Author: Alix Pirani
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Book Review:
Reviews
Authors: Gemma Corbett, Geoff Lamb, Vivienne Silver-Leigh, Aaron Balick, John Rowan
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Article:
Ethical PRACTICE issues
Author: Tony Morris
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