The following lists the contents of Self and Society, Volume 28 Issue 5.
Each article can be downloaded as a PDF, but only if you are logged in as an AHP subscriber.
The table of contents for this issue can be downloaded as a PDF file.


Editorial:
Now—an update from the editors
Authors: Maxine Linnell, Alexandra Chalfont
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AHPP celebrates and reflects on being humanistic:
1. Is It possible to be human in an inhuman world?
Author: Philip Rogers
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Abstract:

By describing ourselves as humanistic we have important things to contribute to creating a more humane world. I would like to suggest that it starts within, within us as individuals and within us as humanistic organisations. In our conference, ‘To be or not to be Humanistic’, one thing was said that has stayed with me: ‘If we say we are humanistic, could that subtly imply that others are inhumanistic!’ We must take care to prevent this happening.


2. Being humanistic is sharing our humanity
Author: Eric Whitton
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3. Is it Possible to be Human in an Inhuman World?
Author: Josie Gregory
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Abstract:

The title implies that the world is inhuman, which it is in terms of the natural world, and not when speaking of human beings. It depends on how you interpret the word inhuman. For the purpose of this debate I am choosing to relate the term to an attribute of being human: language and speaking out. Experiencing inhuman behaviour is often linked to the ability to use this attribute.


Article:
Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
Author: Babette Rothschild
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Abstract:

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) disrupts the functioning of those afflicted by it, interfering with the ability to meet their daily needs and perform the most basic tasks. Trauma continues to intrude on the lives of people with PTSD as they relive the life-threatening experiences they have suffered with visual, auditory and/or somatic reality reacting in mind and body as though such events were still occurring. Not everyone experiencing traumatic events develops PTSD; it is a complex psychobiological condition that can emerge in the wake of life-threatening experiences when normal psychological and somatic stress responses to a traumatic event are not resolved and released. In this paper it is proposed that Autonomic Nervous System hyperarousal is at the core of PTSD and the driving force behind phenomena such as dissociation, freezing and flashbacks. Acute traumatic reactions are differentiated from PTSD and strategies for intervention are suggested.


Existence, Essence and Enlightenment
Author: David Brazier
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The regular COLUMN
Author: Moira Lake
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Abstract:

Since going recently to a conference entitled, ‘Psychosis and Spirituality’ I'm feeling frustrated, again, by the madness of conventional thinking in the mental health field. I'm considering the damage so many of us therapists do by promoting maddened thinking and telling maddening stories about reality to ourselves and our clients. This culturally sanctioned mad thinking has driven up the cost of ‘sanity’ to an appallingly high level, and the price continues to rise.


AHP page
Author: John Buckle
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AHPP page
Author: Tone Horwood
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Book Review:
Reviews
Authors: Vivienne Silver-Leigh, Vivienne Silver-Leigh, David Kalisch
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Letter:
Letters
Authors: Dany Nobus, Don Thelpme
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Article:
Notes for Authors
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